Supporting Local Creators: Bricks & Wood

A Q&A with Kacey Lynch

BY LAUREN JACOBY

Supporting our local creatives is a great way to directly have a positive impact in our communities, and invest our money locally. By supporting locally made products, we are making sure we avoid things like child labor and unnecessary pollution. We interviewed Kacey Lynch, the designer behind LA-based Bricks & Wood, to find out more about the brand and why you should support your local creatives. According to Kacey, the brand was “created from the idea of creating garments and goods that combine natural elements of ‘bricks’ and ‘wood’ to make sure that each and every thing we produce is based around being original and from a raw state.”

Bricks & Wood  Beanies .

Bricks & Wood Beanies.

How was Bricks & Wood created?

Bricks & Wood was created by natural thought. I initially had another brand that I feel was mimicked to a certain extent. So when I decided to discontinue that brand, I decided to create something natural, organic and real. So that no matter what happens, nobody can take it away from me. This is due to the purity of not only the name, but the concept and ideas that come along with the brand as well.

The name itself came from a collective of names I jotted down on the notes app of my phone. That list was created in a matter of ten minutes. “Bricks & Wood” at the time stuck, but I didn’t have a actual definition for it. When you have a name like that on your hands, overtime the definition creates itself, and it has done just that. To sum up that definition, Bricks & Wood means balance.

Bricks & Wood  Made in America Tee.

Bricks & Wood Made in America Tee.

Where do you draw inspiration from?

I draw inspiration from literally everyday life that surrounds me. I don’t go to fashion blogs, or look at other brands, or any of that traditional stuff. Inspiration is free, so if I allow it to be obtained, it will come. So far that creative process has worked in my favor.

Do you run the business by yourself?

To a certain extent, yes. Thankfully I have family and friends who believe in me and are willing to help out at no charge or no real agreements—whether it’s fulfilling orders, helping with errands, or coming up with ideas. These things play another role in the purity of the brand, and why Bricks & Wood is just a natural flow.

Is all of your merchandise produced locally?

Yes, the only item that’s not processed locally are my Heavy Knit Beanies, which are produced in Portland Oregon.

Has having people in the spotlight wear your merchandise affected the brand at all?

Definitely. Outside of an overwhelming amount of orders and followers in a short period of time, it has also brought awareness to the brands and audiences that I may not have been able to reach on my own—at least not this fast.

Why do you think it’s important that communities start supporting their local brands?

I think in general, it’s important for communities to support their local anything. The world is changing rapidly, and the thing we love the most about our communities is that we get to call it ours. So when the rich man starts to catch wind of something, they all of a sudden see the potential in it and want to invest in it. They sort of control the market, and since we didn’t take advantage of supporting it ourselves, the local economy goes up. The people are mad and are forced to move from places they literally spent their whole lives in. So supporting your local business or brands is important, as long as that business is taking care of you in return.

What makes your brand unique, and what do you want people to know about it?

I think what makes my brand unique is something that is so simple. I think it’s unique because I don’t follow the rules. Streetwear itself was made to be a rebellion to high fashion. So my idea of streetwear is not following the rules of what these expensive brands have created, and to show that we can create goods at a affordable cost and still be looked at as quality.

In regards to what I want people to know about the brand is that Bricks & Wood was created so I can have my freedom. I didn’t enjoy having a boss in all my different work environments, so I became one. Bricks & Wood is a strict reflection of who I am and where I’m from. I’m just here to share that with people, and overall I appreciate everyone’s interest for the brand because people can spend their time and money elsewhere. Buying into the brand you're buying into not just me, but my history as well which I share with a whole community behind me. It’s so much bigger than myself. The time and money spent with us is a investment for something that will result into something we can all share at some point hopefully sooner than later.


All photos courtesy of Kacey Lynch, Bricks & Wood